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The study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the U. Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the women's suffrage movement. The student understands the principles included in the Celebrate Freedom Week program. The student is expected to: (A) identify the major characteristics that define an historical era; (B) identify the major eras in U. history from 1877 to the present and describe their defining characteristics; (C) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods; and (D) explain the significance of the following years as turning points: 1898 (Spanish-American War), 1914-1918 (World War I), 1929 (the Great Depression begins), 1939-1945 (World War II), 1957 (Sputnik launch ignites U. lands on the moon), 1991 (Cold War ends), 2001 (terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon), and 2008 (election of first black president, Barack Obama). The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in the United States from 1877 to 1898. The student is expected to: (A) create thematic maps, graphs, and charts representing various aspects of the United States; and (B) pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings.(B) Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of instruction prescribed under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, students in Grades 3-12 study and recite the following text: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness--That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed." (8) Students identify and discuss how the actions of U. citizens and the local, state, and federal governments have either met or failed to meet the ideals espoused in the founding documents. The student is expected to: (A) analyze and evaluate the text, intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and identify the full text of the first three paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence; (B) analyze and evaluate the application of these founding principles to historical events in U. history; and (C) explain the contributions of the Founding Fathers such as Benjamin Rush, John Hancock, John Jay, John Witherspoon, John Peter Muhlenberg, Charles Carroll, and Jonathan Trumbull Sr. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U. S.-Soviet space race), 1968-1969 (Martin Luther King Jr. The student is expected to: (A) analyze political issues such as Indian policies, the growth of political machines, civil service reform, and the beginnings of Populism; (B) analyze economic issues such as industrialization, the growth of railroads, the growth of labor unions, farm issues, the cattle industry boom, the rise of entrepreneurship, free enterprise, and the pros and cons of big business; (C) analyze social issues affecting women, minorities, children, immigrants, urbanization, the Social Gospel, and philanthropy of industrialists; and (D) describe the optimism of the many immigrants who sought a better life in America. The student understands the emergence of the United States as a world power between 18. The student is expected to: (A) identify reasons for U. involvement in World War II, including Italian, German, and Japanese dictatorships and their aggression, especially the attack on Pearl Harbor; (B) evaluate the domestic and international leadership of Franklin D. The student is expected to: (A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and (B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.The student is expected to: (A) explain why significant events, policies, and individuals such as the Spanish-American War, U. expansionism, Henry Cabot Lodge, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Theodore Roosevelt, Sanford B. Du Bois on American society; and (C) evaluate the impact of third parties, including the Populist and Progressive parties. The student understands significant events, social issues, and individuals of the 1920s. The student understands the domestic and international impact of U. Roosevelt and Harry Truman during World War II, including the U. relationship with its allies and domestic industry's rapid mobilization for the war effort; (C) analyze the function of the U. Office of War Information; (D) analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons; (E) analyze major military events of World War II, including the Battle of Midway, the U. military advancement through the Pacific Islands, the Bataan Death March, the invasion of Normandy, fighting the war on multiple fronts, and the liberation of concentration camps; (F) evaluate the military contributions of leaders during World War II, including Omar Bradley, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas Mac Arthur, Chester A. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Berlin airlift, and John F. Source: The provisions of this 113.41 adopted to be effective August 23, 2010, 35 Tex Reg 7232. World History Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012. Students shall be awarded one unit of credit for successful completion of this course. (1)World History Studies is a survey of the history of humankind.Dole, and missionaries moved the United States into the position of a world power; (B) evaluate American expansionism, including acquisitions such as Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico; (C) identify the causes of World War I and reasons for U. entry; (D) understand the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) led by General John J. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes and effects of events and social issues such as immigration, Social Darwinism, eugenics, race relations, nativism, the Red Scare, Prohibition, and the changing role of women; and (B) analyze the impact of significant individuals such as Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan, Henry Ford, Glenn Curtiss, Marcus Garvey, and Charles A. Nimitz, George Marshall, and George Patton; and (G) explain the home front and how American patriotism inspired exceptional actions by citizens and military personnel, including high levels of military enlistment; volunteerism; the purchase of war bonds; Victory Gardens; the bravery and contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Flying Tigers, and the Navajo Code Talkers; and opportunities and obstacles for women and ethnic minorities. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts in the Cold War on the United States. Kennedy's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis; (B) describe how Cold War tensions were intensified by the arms race, the space race, Mc Carthyism, and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), the findings of which were confirmed by the Venona Papers; (C) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in the Korean War and its relationship to the containment policy; (D) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in foreign countries and their relationship to the Domino Theory, including the Vietnam War; (E) analyze the major issues and events of the Vietnam War such as the Tet Offensive, the escalation of forces, Vietnamization, and the fall of Saigon; and (F) describe the responses to the Vietnam War such as the draft, the 26th Amendment, the role of the media, the credibility gap, the silent majority, and the anti-war movement. The student understands the impact of the American civil rights movement. Due to the expanse of world history and the time limitations of the school year, the scope of this course should focus on "essential" concepts and skills that can be applied to various eras, events, and people within the standards in subsection (c) of this section.(2) The following periodization should serve as the framework for the organization of this course: 8000 BC-500 BC (Development of River Valley Civilizations); 500 BC-AD 600 (Classical Era); 600-1450 (Post-classical Era); 1450-1750 (Connecting Hemispheres); 1750-1914 (Age of Revolutions); and 1914-present (20th Century to the Present).

Students examine the impact of geographic factors on major historic events and identify the historic origins of contemporary economic systems.The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code (TEC), 28.002(h). The student is expected to: (A) describe Richard M. involvement in world affairs, including the end of the Cold War, the Persian Gulf War, the Balkans Crisis, 9/11, and the global War on Terror; (B) identify significant social and political advocacy organizations, leaders, and issues across the political spectrum; (C) evaluate efforts by global organizations to undermine U. sovereignty through the use of treaties; (D) analyze the impact of third parties on presidential elections; (E) discuss the historical significance of the 2008 presidential election; and (F) discuss the solvency of long-term entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare. The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major events. free enterprise system such as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) oil embargo, the General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The student understands the economic effects of increased worldwide interdependence as the United States enters the 21st century. The student is expected to: (A) explain actions taken by people to expand economic opportunities and political rights, including those for racial, ethnic, and religious minorities as well as women, in American society; (B) discuss the Americanization movement to assimilate immigrants and American Indians into American culture; (C) explain how the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, gender, and religious groups shape American culture; (D) identify the political, social, and economic contributions of women such as Frances Willard, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, Dolores Huerta, Sonia Sotomayor, and Oprah Winfrey to American society; (E) discuss the meaning and historical significance of the mottos "E Pluribus Unum" and "In God We Trust"; and (F) discuss the importance of congressional Medal of Honor recipients, including individuals of all races and genders such as Vernon J. The student is expected to: (A) explain the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as electric power, telephone and satellite communications, petroleum-based products, steel production, and computers on the economic development of the United States; (B) explain how specific needs result in scientific discoveries and technological innovations in agriculture, the military, and medicine, including vaccines; and (C) understand the impact of technological and management innovations and their applications in the workplace and the resulting productivity enhancements for business and labor such as assembly line manufacturing, time-study analysis, robotics, computer management, and just-in-time inventory management. The student understands the influence of scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the free enterprise system on the standard of living in the United States.(6) Students understand that a constitutional republic is a representative form of government whose representatives derive their authority from the consent of the governed, serve for an established tenure, and are sworn to uphold the constitution. Painter played a role in protecting the rights of the minority during the civil rights movement. The student understands the impact of political, economic, and social factors in the U. Nixon's leadership in the normalization of relations with China and the policy of dtente; (B) describe Ronald Reagan's leadership in domestic and international policies, including Reaganomics and Peace Through Strength; (C) compare the impact of energy on the American way of life over time; (D) describe U. involvement in the Middle East such as support for Israel, the Camp David Accords, the Iran-Contra Affair, Marines in Lebanon, and the Iran Hostage Crisis; (E) describe the causes and key organizations and individuals of the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract with America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority, and the National Rifle Association; and (F) describe significant societal issues of this time period. The student understands the emerging political, economic, and social issues of the United States from the 1990s into the 21st century. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the impact of physical and human geographic factors on the settlement of the Great Plains, the Klondike Gold Rush, the Panama Canal, the Dust Bowl, and the levee failure in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina; and (B) identify and explain reasons for changes in political boundaries such as those resulting from statehood and international conflicts. The student understands the causes and effects of migration and immigration on American society. The student understands the economic effects of World War II and the Cold War. The student is expected to: (A) discuss the role of American entrepreneurs such as Bill Gates, Sam Walton, Este Lauder, Robert Johnson, Lionel Sosa, and millions of small business entrepreneurs who achieved the American dream; and (B) identify the impact of international events, multinational corporations, government policies, and individuals on the 21st century economy. The student understands changes over time in the role of government. The student understands the changing relationships among the three branches of the federal government. Supreme Court justices and the presidential election of 2000. The student understands the impact of constitutional issues on American society. The student is expected to: (A) analyze how scientific discoveries, technological innovations, and the application of these by the free enterprise system, including those in transportation and communication, improve the standard of living in the United States; (B) explain how space technology and exploration improve the quality of life; and (C) understand how the free enterprise system drives technological innovation and its application in the marketplace such as cell phones, inexpensive personal computers, and global positioning products. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology.(3) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as state papers, legal documents, charters, constitutions, biographies, autobiographies, speeches, letters, literature, music, art, and architecture is encouraged.Motivating resources are available from museums, art galleries, and historical sites.




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